wiki

The making of ‘Neurocracy’ – a dynamic murder-mystery told through a fictional Wikipedia – NME.com

Summary

Neurocracy isn’t short of disturbing concepts, from governments that can monitor your activity with brain implants, to an AI game show host that might have committed murder. But perhaps the most chilling element of Neurocracy‘s near-future sci-fi is its references to COVID-19 as a past event. As you browse Neurocracy‘s fictional version of Wikipedia, which details a world twenty years in the future, you’ll see the virus frequently referenced in the context of Neurocracy‘s own, ficti…….

Neurocracy isn’t short of disturbing concepts, from governments that can monitor your activity with brain implants, to an AI game show host that might have committed murder. But perhaps the most chilling element of Neurocracy‘s near-future sci-fi is its references to COVID-19 as a past event. As you browse Neurocracy‘s fictional version of Wikipedia, which details a world twenty years in the future, you’ll see the virus frequently referenced in the context of Neurocracy‘s own, fictional pandemic that sets the groundwork for its futuristic murder mystery.

“It was always going to be about a pandemic, that part was written years before,” says Joannes Truyens, Neurocracy‘s creator and co-developer. “So the fact that an actual pandemic suddenly came knocking gave the story an edge that we were able to really build on.”

It’s a testament to Neurocracy‘s plausibility that these references don’t feel gauche or exploitative, but a natural and necessary part of its world building. Then again, like the website on which was based, Neurocracy was designed to absorb and react to new information. It’s one of the most unusual games to release this year, to the point where calling it a game is not necessarily helpful in explaining it. It’s most closely related to interactive fiction, although it has more in common with the online phenomenon Blaseball than it does, say, a Twine game.

The seeds of Neurocracy have been around for twenty years, ever since Truyens played Deus Ex for the first time. “I really loved its depiction of a contemporary, near-future, grounded science-fiction world, and I wanted to create one for myself,” he says. Truyens began building the backstory of Neurocracy soon after, but struggled to find a mode of storytelling that he was comfortable using. He initially conceived Neurocracy as a Half-Life 2 modification, but decided this was “wildly overambitious” for a teenager with no programming skill. Later, he tried writing it as a novel, but found this equally implausible. “My ability to write prose and dialogue is non-existent,” he jokes.

As Truyens grappled with finding a form for his story, the world of Neurocracy kept growing. Eventually, he decided to organise Neurocracy‘s lore into a wiki. “Without realising it, that was the first version of Neurocracy, because I found myself having a lot of fun putting that wiki together,” he says. “As soon as I got that idea, everything else sort of fell into place.”

Neurocracy. Credit: Playthroughline.

Wikipedia provided the ideal form for Neurocracy. Its structure was perfect for introducing the people, organisation, and events in Neurocracy‘s world, while providing Truyens with the clear and consistent voice he’d struggled to pin down during Neurocracy‘s novel phase. “It was basically the first idea where I felt that I was comfortable enough tackling it by myself,” he says.

Perhaps most of all, Neurocracy‘s wiki …….

Source: https://www.nme.com/features/gaming-features/the-making-of-neurocracy-a-dynamic-murder-mystery-told-through-a-fictional-wikipedia-3105555