wiki

Neurocracy is future fiction in the form of Wikipedia – The Verge

Summary

In 2048, Wikipedia doesn’t exist. Without enough donations and too many copyright claims, it has to shut down. In 2049, a new substitute rises: Omnipedia, built in the spirit of its predecessor as a free encyclopedia for all. Days after Omnipedia’s launch, its main investor Xu Shaoyong, arguably the most powerful man on the planet, is assassinated.

This is the fictional universe of Neurocracy, an experimental narrative …….

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In 2048, Wikipedia doesn’t exist. Without enough donations and too many copyright claims, it has to shut down. In 2049, a new substitute rises: Omnipedia, built in the spirit of its predecessor as a free encyclopedia for all. Days after Omnipedia’s launch, its main investor Xu Shaoyong, arguably the most powerful man on the planet, is assassinated.

This is the fictional universe of Neurocracy, an experimental narrative project that takes place over 10 episodes, starting on July 14th. Through Omnipedia, it invites readers to solve Xu’s murder in a near future where millions of people suffer from Cariappa-Muren disease, a fatal condition caused by infected tuna. Famed neuroscientist and activist Connie Muren, who helped discover the disease, has vanished without a trace. The environment is falling apart from irreversible climate change, and the world lives under a biosurveillance system called G6.

Whether you see Neurocracy as hypertext fiction or an offshoot of an alternate reality game, it’s the first project of its kind, using a medium that we take for granted every day. The entire game takes place in your browser on the Omnipedia site. Each weekly episode represents one day in Neurocracy, and as time “passes,” Omnipedia entries will undergo updates and revisions just like the real Wikipedia. There are other types of wiki-based metafiction — projects like Excalibur, which is styled as a fan-made wiki for a fictional TV show. But none that tell a story quite like this.

The game has been in the works for years, albeit in different forms. In 2019, its creators Joannes Truyens and Matei Stanca began considering crowdfunding to keep development going; writer Truyens had started working on the project in 2016 based on an idea for a sci-fi world that he had 20 years ago as a teen. The following year, they raised a modest £12,000 on Kickstarter, which allowed them to commission art for Omnipedia from concept artist and illustrator Alice Duke. Since then, the project has cultivated a tight-knit community that eagerly shares theories on the Neurocracy Discord. The final project boasts over 30 different articles, each painstakingly constructed in the same familiar dry wiki-tone with meticulous citations, each echoes with its own episodic variations.

But 2019 was an eternity ago. Our new corona-reality shares unnerving parallels with Neurocracy, which revolves around all-too-familiar points of modern anxiety: pandemics, billionaires, AI, climate change, and biosecurity in the name of public health. “Even when an actual, real-life pandemic dropped and started preempting some of Neurocracy’s worldbuilding, the Wikipedia format has enabled us to quickly adapt and incorporate the lessons from this first modern-day pandemic into our fictional one,” says Truyens, who struggled over whether to mention COVID-19 at all. “Ultimately it’s one of those mass-scale events that divides history into a before and after, so I couldn’t leave it out.”

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Source: https://www.theverge.com/2021/7/14/22577088/neurocracy-wikipedia-murder-mystery-game